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Thread: Airflow improvements your Evolv ATX Tempered Glass case: Two (new?) easy tricks!!!

  1. #1
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    Airflow improvements your Evolv ATX Tempered Glass case: Two (new?) easy tricks!!!

    Is average cooling good enough?

    Looking at the Evolv ATX you know it is not the most free flowing design out there. Toms Hardware gave it average cooling scores for example. Maybe that is good enough for most... but I like to engineer things, and had time to kill before all my computer components arrived, so I set out doing some research to identify how I could optimize things. My cooling goals were: easy, cheap, and good looking (ideally reversible) mods.

    But lest back up a bit...

    You had me at Tempered Glass

    If you are like me you were attracted to the Enthoo Evolv ATX Tempered glass case for the looks. As a Mac guy who opted to return to the dark side (tempted by the ability to build and hot rod a high end computer, and save a lot of money doing it), I wanted something simple and sleek. There are lots of functional PC cases out there that just don't have much visual interest... or alternatively have too muck visual interest. I wanted something understated, yet classy. The black version of the Evolv ATX case with the tempered glass did the trick. It looks like something apple would design, but a bit more sinister. And it looks even better in the flesh.

    The build

    This computer is a bit overkill, but I figured I don't upgrade my computers much, so why not go big and forget about it for a while? The main goal is to have some fun gaming (Mass Effect Andromeda, Sim racers, etc), combined with some photoshop now and then, and the odd gopro video editing. When selecting components I got pretty deep into the overclocking rabbet hole (translation = heat). I stuck with a single GPU as many games do not support dual cards. I admit to having ignored the computer scene since the 2000's when I was more heavy into Apple (remember the Imac with the round base and the screen on the adjustable metal arm? Still cool as hell!). I thus had to do a bit of a crash course in what was what... and ended up getting some prime kit as a result.

    Intel Core i7-6700K 4.0GHz Quad-Core Processor
    NZXT Kraken X61 106.1 CFM Liquid CPU Cooler
    ASRock Z170 OC Formula ATX LGA1151 Motherboard (yellow)
    G.Skill TridentZ Series 32GB (2 x 16GB) DDR4-3200 Memory (black and Yellow)
    Samsung 950 PRO 256GB M.2-2280 Solid State Drive
    Samsung 850 EVO-Series 1TB 2.5" Solid State Drive
    Asus GeForce GTX 1080 8GB STRIX Video Card
    Phanteks Enthoo Evolv ATX Glass ATX Mid Tower Case
    EVGA SuperNOVA P2 750W 80+ Platinum Certified Fully-Modular ATX Power Supply
    Microsoft Windows 10 Home OEM 64-bit
    G.Skill RIPJAWS KM780 RGB Wired Gaming Keyboard
    Razer DeathAdder Chroma Wired Optical Mouse

    Top mounted 280mm radiator Clearance?

    I have my case, but pretty much everything else is currently in the mail as of this writing, probably to arrive in the next week or two. So what I have been doing is reading every review I can get my hands on for my various chosen components in attempt to estimate and anticipate any fitment or design issues (pcpartpicker said I was ok, but I am a details guy...).



    Of note, my NZXT Kracken X61 radiator is 52mm thick, and is a 280mm unit (2x140mm fans). So what that means is that it will have a 48mm clearance to the Motherboard (DIMM clearance) when installed on the top mounting panel. Note: you have a 68mm clearance with a smaller 240mm (2x120 fans) radiator. No big deal, except that I opted for G.Skill Trident Z ram which sits at 44mm high. The only build I could find with the Evolv ATX case and the trident Z ram used a front mounted 280mm cooler. I assume this is because there was not clearance for the ram.



    Standard DDR4 ram is about 31.25mm. So do the math and I have 4mm of breathing room between a top mounted 280mm cooler, and the trident Z ram in this case. Now, this assumes that motherboards are standard thickness... so I will know for sure when I get the cooler and motherboard.

    What if my ram and 280mm radiator do not fit?

    1. I suppose I could front mount the radiator, but I really do not want to go there.

    2. I could remove the sliding fan bracket up top, and modify the case to accept the radiator on the case frame itself. This would pull the 52mm Kracken unit up high enough (about 25mm) to presumably clear the ram, no matter how tall it is (Ideal). Based on my measurements, it would be close. I will know for sure when I have my motherboard. The downside of this option is that the already restrictive airflow design of the top would get a bit worse, with the fans even closer to the aluminum top.

    3. I shave down the heat syncs of the Trident Ram on the top end so that they clear the radiator. Not ideal, but a dremel would do it.

    4. Maybe it will just barely fit... I doubt it.

    No one is perfect

    So this brings me to the big weakness of the Evolv ATX case: cooling. Sleek clean looking cases tend to lack those big (ugly) openings for lots of fans and whatnot. This case is no exception. The panels that keep this case looking so clean and stylish, also impede air flow. Again, Toms Hardware rated it as average for cooling, but it was only compared to two cases... so who knows.

    So how does one modify such a beautiful case without ruining it?

    Enthoo Evolv ATX Tempered Glass Cooling tips

    Lets start with what I learned online...

    1. When it comes to the top mounted radiators... make sure that you block off all unused airspaces on the mounting tray to prevent hot air exhaust from recirculating back in the top of the case.

    2. Remove the two front, and two back screws of the case's aluminum top. Pop it out of the clips, and just have the aluminum lid sit on top of the case. This adds about 6mm of space around the entire top of the case, greatly increasing exhaust area, while not overly changing the appearance of the case. More cooling and it still looks good. Double bonus is that it gives the radiator fans more room to do their thing (also allowing you to mount the radiator higher, such as to the steel frame of the case itself without choking off the fans).

    3. Remove the empty PCI slot covers. This reduces air pressures in the case more easily, and allows hot air to escape the case with less resistance.

    Now for the front...

    4. Mount the front aluminum panel farther forward. This one is super easy, reversible, and only costs as much as a few washers/spacers (which for me was nothing).

    Start by opening your spare parts box, and grabbing four screws noted below. You should have lots of them, so don't be afraid to use four. Beside them are four polyurithane "things" I found. I forget what they were from, but I got them in a hardware store. I think they are feet for small objects that you screw on to prevent scratching. Or maybe something from plumbing. Either way I got them in the local hardware store. Any rubber gasket, garden hose gasket, or stacks of washers would do.



    Remove the two screws from the top and bottom mounting bracket.


    Note the near perfect fit. Sometimes it is better to be lucky than good.


    See what I just did there? You need the longer screws to anchor things with the spacer. The original screws are just too short for the task.


    I opted for 4mm. It does not seem like much, but multiply that gain around the entire front panel, and you have increased your intake by a large amount.
    Last edited by gliding_serpent; 11-21-2016 at 08:49 PM.
    Enthoo Evolv ATX TG
    Intel 6700K
    Asus Strix 1080
    NZXT Kracken x61
    ASRock Z170 Formula OC
    G.Skill Trident Z DDR4-3200 16Gx2
    Some other stuff...

  2. #2
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    Continued...

    Before

    Never mind the finger prints...





    After









    A bit more extreme

    Now, before I figured out how to do the above options, My plan was to add in some high end breathing holes. The nicest I could find, that would add to, not take away from the look of the case was the following from MNPCTech.com

    12mm Overkill "Honeycomb" PC Fan Grille






    They have 140 and 120mm options, but I figure that two 120mm on the front panel, and two on the top panel would do the trick as 140mm would start to look a bit visually overpowering. They could just be passive holes to increase airflow in the center of the front and top panels. Yes, they take away from the simplicity of the case, but they would hide the machining of the required holes, and the anodized black aluminum would blend right in. I would get everything measured and cut at a local machine shop.

    Tempting... but they are 50$ a pop... or about the cost of the case itself!

    I kind of want to add them however, but before I go on a path of no return, I will compare my computer temps with the stock case, to the lifted top/front. Only if both are unacceptable will I consider the breathing holes.
    Last edited by gliding_serpent; 11-21-2016 at 08:59 PM.
    Enthoo Evolv ATX TG
    Intel 6700K
    Asus Strix 1080
    NZXT Kracken x61
    ASRock Z170 Formula OC
    G.Skill Trident Z DDR4-3200 16Gx2
    Some other stuff...

  3. #3
    Surprised no one has commented on this thread. Thanks for the suggestions gilding_serpent. I had heard of blocking the top vents that aren't used, but had not thought about extending the front panel. Just did it tonight and seems to be helping a little.

  4. #4
    Hi guys I'll give my opinion i replaced the bracket with solid ones pci brackets i just finished my Enthoo luxe tempered glass and airpreasure with high performing fans i don't think heat dissipation is something to be worried about in they way i setup the airflow in the case.

    In my build i focused on airflow direction and I put gaskets on the rad up top and got a noise dampening kit and I tryied put cover any Chassi openenings me thoughts here is when ur using water cooling in ur setup it is important to use static pressure fans on the radiators well airflowfans i put them only at intake exsaust fan that have to take hot air out I use pref SP/AF fan in my case I only use 120mm 140mm corsair ML pro fans since they are excellent in all of my demands airflow and really good static pressure and maglev fans is quite silent and this rewiev among the more complete testing of high performance fans http://thermalbench.com/category/fans/ check it out good stuff
    Last edited by Splash0rr; 01-09-2017 at 04:34 PM.

  5. #5
    Hadnt see the front plate mod before, used some rubber washers with the original screws still fitting...

    still trying to find if anybody has cut slots or something else in the top to help with hot air venting as its a sham this is the only thing that lets this case down IMHO

  6. #6
    Did the ram fit without modding?

  7. #7
    Your information is very useful for anyone who comes in and is a very interesting information.




    สล๊อต

  8. #8
    Quote Originally Posted by shultz View Post
    Hadnt see the front plate mod before, used some rubber washers with the original screws still fitting...

    still trying to find if anybody has cut slots or something else in the top to help with hot air venting as its a sham this is the only thing that lets this case down IMHO
    As of today, I have.

    After I completed the build I too noticed the very high temps inside. What bothered me most is that temps kept rising the longer the game session. That means airflow is very restricted. I did the common trick of detaching the top panel and letting it rest on the clips. That extra 5mm mattered the world as temps dropped instantly. That made me think there must have been a lot of heat stuck. Something I noticed because the top panel and the glass side panels were very hot as well.

    Luckily I work at technical college, so bringing the panel with me to work, the guys from the machine department told me that our water jet cutter would have no problems with this material. All I needed to do is make a drawing of how I wanted the extra vent holes.

    I added 3 cuts, each 20mm wide, 230mm long, in line with the side vent holes and power button.

    To cover up the new openings I ordered this material: https://www.highflow.nl/aircooling/f...ack.html?sl=nl

    Some pictures, I'll add some final pictures after it's done.:



  9. #9
    Quote Originally Posted by Kaap View Post
    As of today, I have.

    After I completed the build I too noticed the very high temps inside. What bothered me most is that temps kept rising the longer the game session. That means airflow is very restricted. I did the common trick of detaching the top panel and letting it rest on the clips. That extra 5mm mattered the world as temps dropped instantly. That made me think there must have been a lot of heat stuck. Something I noticed because the top panel and the glass side panels were very hot as well.

    Luckily I work at technical college, so bringing the panel with me to work, the guys from the machine department told me that our water jet cutter would have no problems with this material. All I needed to do is make a drawing of how I wanted the extra vent holes.

    I added 3 cuts, each 20mm wide, 230mm long, in line with the side vent holes and power button.

    To cover up the new openings I ordered this material: https://www.highflow.nl/aircooling/f...ack.html?sl=nl

    Some pictures, I'll add some final pictures after it's done.
    is there any data file you can send me for the mod. my dad is a machinist. i am wondering if i gave him the file, if their machine could do the same? (not sure if they would be allowed to do personal stuff at his job). i also know in San Jose there is a tech workshop that has a lot of machines. it would be nice to be able to do the same to mine.

    so what were the results. have the temps dropped drastically?

    when you noticed the heat, were you already doing the cover mod, where you cover any open vent on the top plate so heat cant go back into the case?

    i only ask because i have the case, but i havent put the system together yet. i plan to tape off the top (besides where the fans exhaust heat). i was hoping that would be good enough. but if its not i woulnt mind modding the top like you did.

  10. #10
    Quote Originally Posted by carlosriosness View Post
    so what were the results. have the temps dropped drastically?
    On idle my Motherboardtemp went down from 31 to 25. My CPU is still at 30, but that's because it's AIO cooled. So no direct effect on the CPU for me, but I can imagine for an aircooler CPU that temp would also make that drop. During a gaming session last night that case/mobo temp stuck around 30-33 where as without the mod this temp would rise up to 40 and beyond. At a good gaming session my CPU runs high into the 40's.

    However, indirectly my CPU will also benefit from this. Lower casetemp means my AIO absorbing less warmth from it's surroundings, thus having an easier time cooling my CPU, thus also less noise.
    Quote Originally Posted by carlosriosness View Post
    when you noticed the heat, were you already doing the cover mod, where you cover any open vent on the top plate so heat cant go back into the case?
    When I noticed the heat building up I was running the top panel it's meant to be. I than clicked it off and let it rest on top of the case, as is suggested in the openingpost. That already mattered a lot so if you rather not mod your case, that is a very easy but very effective work-around.

    I did not cover any openings in the mountingsystem in the top. And I don't think I will either. The new mod is sizes and positioned exactly above the 2 140MM outtake fans. The holes cover an area of 230MM long by 120MM wide. Each hole is measured 230MM*20MM. The fans push up straight into the new vent holes. This will cause a natural airflow where I doubt much heat will get bounced back into the case.
    Quote Originally Posted by carlosriosness View Post
    i only ask because i have the case, but i havent put the system together yet. i plan to tape off the top (besides where the fans exhaust heat). i was hoping that would be good enough. but if its not i woulnt mind modding the top like you did.
    I strongly suggest that letting the top just 'rest' on top of the case is a much better solution than taping off the bracket. Ofcourse, doing both...
    Last edited by Kaap; 04-22-2017 at 03:15 AM.

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