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bote110
01-29-2016, 04:35 AM
I have a Phanteks Enthoo Series case an would like to add more fans to get the best cooling
I can, what would be the best config. and what would be the best fans to use.
What is static an pressure fans?
What would be the best one to get?

doyll
01-30-2016, 11:29 AM
Well, sorry to say but telling us you have an Enthoo series case doesn't tell us much. Does Phanteks make a case that is not an Enthoo series? :D
SP or static pressure fans is a marketing name. The whole fan specification is is pretty much marketing hype with little to no relevance to actual use. CFM ratings are maximum airflow of fan in open with no Resistance at all and running at full speed, and static pressure rating is how much pressure the fan has when air stops moving while running at full speed. Now I might on rare occasion set a fan on my desk to blow air at me while I work, but I will never set one face or back down flat on the bench so it can't move any air. All of my 'normal' uses of fans is with some resistance .. and usually not running at full speed either.

But to give the short answer, for Phanteks cases the PH-F140SP is a good fan to use.

poseidonbc
01-30-2016, 05:29 PM
which is the best for the front intake fan PH-F140XP or PH-F140SP for PHANTEKS ENTHOO PRO?

doyll
01-30-2016, 06:19 PM
which is the best for the front intake fan PH-F140XP or PH-F140SP for PHANTEKS ENTHOO PRO?

Depends on if you want to use PWM control or variable voltage. XP is PWM. Both have near identical performance. I know, the specs are not identical. but I'll bet if you are using one and switch to the other and set speed curve the same you would never know it was changed.

poseidonbc
01-30-2016, 06:57 PM
I will connect the fans in the phanteks pwm hub at this time. So if I purchase PH-F140XP, will be ok?
because maybe in the future I will connect fans to the mobo headers

doyll
01-30-2016, 07:18 PM
Same answer as before. Depends on what headers on motherboard you hook them to.

The Phanteks PWM Fan Hub is not a PWM fan hub. It is a PWM controlled hub for variable voltage fans. Phanteks does great things, but naming a PWM controlled variable voltage 3-pin fan hub was not a good choice of names.

You can use the PH-F140XP on the hub as a variable voltage fan. but you cannot use it as a PWM fan.

A for using it on motherboard. Do not think all 4-pin headers on a motherboard are PWM. The 4th pin (PWM signal pin) is normally not used. You see, 3-pin and 4-pinplugs can be used on both 3-pin and 4-pin headers. the first 3 pins are the same. The difference is in 3pin headers pin-2 is often variable voltage to control fan speed. If header is PWM pin-4 is PWM signal and pin-3 is constant 12v.

I know, it sounds confusing. Hopefully I've explained it so you understand. If not, ask questions and I'll try to explain it better.

bote110
02-03-2016, 01:21 PM
You know the case config. for the fan Front,Top,Rear and Bottom . Right now the intake is in the front and exit air flow is in the rear , if I was to add more fans to the top an bottom would the top be a intake flow and the bottom a exit air flow? Would it cause problem with the cpu cooler {cooler master 212 evo w/2x 120 fans blowing to the rear of the case} blowing air out to the rear of the case?

doyll
02-03-2016, 02:05 PM
You know the case config. for the fan Front,Top,Rear and Bottom . Right now the intake is in the front and exit air flow is in the rear , if I was to add more fans to the top an bottom would the top be a intake flow and the bottom a exit air flow? Would it cause problem with the cpu cooler {cooler master 212 evo w/2x 120 fans blowing to the rear of the case} blowing air out to the rear of the case?
Where ever a fan is placed it causes air movement. Placing back as exhaust, top as intake front and intake bottom as exhaust CPU cooler pushing back and air currents are fighting each other all over the place.

We do not want to 'blow' air in and out of the case. We want to 'flow' cool air in and to components and 'flow' the heated air coming out of components out of the case without it contaminating and heating up the cool air flowing to them.

Setting up a case for optimum cooling

Setting up the case for optimum cooling is often the hardest and most time consuming part of a build... And the most neglected by most builders.


There is much more to cooling than good cases and good CPU / GPU coolers. Add the fact that many GPU's make more heat than CPU means getting that heat out of the case and keeping a cool airflow to components can be a challenge.
Cases, especially those with filters, usually benefit from fans with higher static pressure ratings than stock fans... "cooler" fans instead of "case" fans.
Intakes are typically have more restricted than exhaust because of air filters, more restrictive grills, HDD cages, etc.
I prefer more intake than exhaust. And don't confuse number of fans with amount of airflow... or airflow with airblow
airflow is flowing cool air from intake to component and flowing hot air from component out of case without the hot air mixing with the cool air.
airblow is lots of fans blowing air with some of hot air from components mixing with cool air making it warmer resulting in warm air not cooling components as well as the cool air will.
Putting fans in case as intake and/or exhaust is only the first step. These fans only move air in and out of case.
This does not mean heated air is not mixing with cool air.
Nor does it mean cool air is going to where it is needed.
Getting the air to flow inside of case properly is even more important. We still need to manage where the air flows inside the case. We can do this several ways; deflectors, more intake fans.. & exhaust fans, removing vent grills, removing HDD cage, using fans with higher pressure/airflow, building ducts to or from CPU/GPU cooler, etc.
Using a remote temperature sensor to monitor what air temps are is the key to finding out where the cool air is flowing and knowing heated air is not mixing into it. By monitoring this we can than make changes to get airflow the way we want it.
Keep in mind your case needs to flow more air than components do. It isn't so much how many fans but how well they flow air through the case. If component fans move more air than case fans move through case components are using their own heated exhaust to make up the difference and case heats up. Good rule of thumb is 25-50% more case cfm than component cfm but well tuned airflow can be almost equal equal.
Traditional tower cooler exhausting toward back of case must have rear / rear & top back case exhaust fan that remove as much or more cfm than cooler fans exhaust.
A duct from back of cooler to back of case (like Thermalright HR-22 uses) is also an option that works very well.
For example

My Enthoo Primo system has three 2x front and 2x bottom intake fans with no exhaust fans while CPU under PH-TC14PE with TY-143 130cfm fans and GPU with custom shroud using 2x TY-100 44cfm fans
Case = 222cfm
Components = 218cfm
Air temp inside of case is never more than 3c above room.
2x front intakes & CPU cooler TY-143 fans are PWM controlled by CPU fan header to Phanteks PWM fan hub for case fans.
2x bottom intakes & GPU TY-100 fans are PWM controlled by GPU PWM header to another PWM fan hub for case fans.



It is amazing how much cooler a system runs (and quieter) once the case airflow is setup to keep heated exhaust from contaminating cool intake air. Once we start doing these things, the concept seems like a no-brainer, yet most users seem to think more fans and/or powerful fans are needed to get better cooling. The reality is it's not so much the power and amount of air the fans move, but the currents / pathways the air flows on it's way to components and away from components on it's way out of case that is important. Fan power/airflow only needs to be a little more than the amount the components are using at any given time. Using too much air speed, too many fans usually results in airblowing all over the plae rather than flowing where it needs to go and ends up being as detrimental to case's flow pattern as not using fans with enough flow .. and if the flow isn't tuned to keep cool and heated air separate the system is not going run as cool as it can.

Death2gnomes
02-05-2016, 01:20 AM
There is an old saying, "Heat Rises". Keep this in mind when directing fans in any case you have. In a case, it is easier to move hot air out and away then it is to force cool air in when the air has no where to go.

doyll
02-05-2016, 04:25 AM
There is an old saying, "Heat Rises". Keep this in mind when directing fans in any case you have. In a case, it is easier to move hot air out and away then it is to force cool air in when the air has no where to go.

Sorry but the "Heat Rise" has no relevance when there are other forces involved .. like fans.

There is no difference in 'move hot air out and away' than there is 'to force cool air in'. The reason is it displaces itself. Whatever energy is required to move air into a case is also needed to move it out of the case. So it makes no difference if you pull the air our of push the air in.
A case will only flow as much air as the smaller of the two, intake or exhaust.
For air to enter the case, air already inside the case must leave the case.
For air to leave the case, air outside the case much come in to replace it.

Now, using 2x fans in series (one intake and one exhaust) increases their ability to overcome pressure which in most cases (no pun) increases the overall airflow. But a single intake fan that has more ability to overcome resistance can easily move as much air through the case when used as intake or exhaust. I prefer using them as filtered intakes because filtered air means less just buildup inside of case. ;)

Hooded
02-10-2016, 09:25 AM
I have to agree 100% with what doyll is saying.

I have 7 different cases up and running each has it's own custom airflow setup. Some are air cooled and some are liquid cooled. I like to setup my systems with a positive air pressure inside the case so to prevent dust coming into the case. I use dust filters on all my intake fans. Really helps to keep the insides clean.

Both my Enthoo Pro, and my Enthoo Primo builds are liquid cooled and have excellent airflow. I use the Phanteks fan hub in my Prmo build
to run 8 140mm fans and it works just like doyll has said. 3 of them are the fans that came with case and 5 or Bitfinex fans on the rads.